Clarence Barry-Austin, PC

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(973) 453-9495

Clarence Barry-Austin, PC

If you’re involved in a fall, I would take a photograph of the location of the fall and the surrounding conditions that caused you to fall. If you’re involved in a car accident, I would take photographs of the damage to the vehicles and the license plate of the other vehicle. If the police don’t arrive in a timely manner, collect the other party’s credentials, including their driver’s license number and their insurance information.

Keep in mind that you don’t want to be too animated at the scene because it can agitate the other party and lead to a confrontation. Calmly collect the information that you need in order to memorialize the facts and the circumstances of the accident.

Should I Take an Ambulance to the Hospital Following an Accident, or Is It Okay to Go on My Own?

If an ambulance has been called to the scene, take the ambulance to the hospital. Many times, injuries that result from accidents are not immediately apparent, and you can exacerbate the injury if you don’t seek medical attention right away. It’s better, therefore, to accept maximum medical care. If you’re taking the ambulance, you’re in medical care from the scene of the accident to the hospital, where, of course, you’re under further medical care.

If you choose to drive yourself to the hospital, you could suffer a blackout on your way, or the injury could begin to manifest itself and impair your ability to drive, which could cause a second accident. Even if there’s no appreciable pain and suffering or discernible injury, it’s better to be safe than sorry. There’s no harm done if you take the ambulance to the hospital, only to be told there’s no injury, as the cost of the ambulance will likely be covered by your automobile insurance, either in full or in large part.

What If I Feel Fine After Being in an Accident Where I Was Struck by Another Driver or Injured on Someone’s Property? Is It Okay If I Go Home and Seek Medical Help Later If Needed?

Again, even if there’s no significant pain, bleeding, or swelling that points to an injury, I always encourage people who’ve experienced a traumatic event, like a car accident or a fall, to get checked out as soon as possible afterward. Don’t detour home or to some other place; go as soon as possible to the hospital. Children can bounce back very quickly after having been in an accident. Adults, on the other hand, take much longer to recover and sometimes don’t realize how badly they have been injured until sometime after the accident.

What Information Should I Share With My Treating Physician Following an Accident Involving an Ongoing Personal Injury Case? Can Any of That Be Used Against Me?

You should provide full disclosure to your physician. The doctor will ask you pertinent questions concerning the manner of accident, your complaints, the duration of your complaints, the location of your complaints, etc. Your physician will also conduct a physical examination and then determine what additional diagnostic testing may be necessary and what treatment to recommend. They might also ask you about your medical history, whether you’ve had any similar accidents in the past. I encourage you to answer all of the doctor’s questions honestly and not hold things back—the doctor needs that information to provide the appropriate care.

After an accident, your first priority should be to get better, not to maximize the recovery amount in your case. The recovery is temporary, but your health is long-lasting. Don’t worry about saying something to the doctor that can be used against you. Tell the doctor everything they ask about to ensure you’re getting the highest quality of care.

For more information on Personal Injury Law in New Jersey, an initial consultation is your next best step. Get the information and legal answers you are seeking by calling (973) 453-9495 today.

Clarence Barry-Austin, Esq.

Call Us To Discuss Your Case
(973) 453-9495